This is the first year the district is implementing our new summer reading program!

The Summer Reading Letter to Parents and Independent Reading Sheet is available for download, but the Independent Reading Sheet needs to be completed by the beginning of the school year.

Remember that you only need to read one of the books listed for your grade level!
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Students entering 6th grade may choose:
  • Wringer, by Jerry Spinelli---For as long as Palmer LaRue can remember, he has dreaded the day he will turn ten and must take his place beside the other ten-year-old boys in town and become a wringer, a tradition passed down from father to son. From Newbery Medal winner Jerry Spinelli comes a gripping tale of how one boy learns how to overcome his fears.
  • Crash, by Jerry Spinelli---John "Crash" Coogan is the typical jock. At least what most of us have in mind as a jock. He's cool; he's popular; he's well-dressed. Crash has a wonderful life, until life deals him a hand that he could not have expected. This coming-of-age story follows 7th grader John "Crash" Coogan's gradual progression from cocky football jock to mature, sensitive friend, brother, and son.



Students entering 7th grade may choose:
  • Drums, Girls, and Dangerous Pie, by Jordan Sonnenblick---Thirteen-year-old Steven has a totally normal life. He plays drums in the All-Star Jazz band, has a crush on the hottest girl in the school, and is constantly annoyed by his five-year-old brother, Jeffrey. When Jeffrey is diagnosed with leukemia, Steven's world is turned upside down. He is forced to deal with his brother's illness and his parents' attempts to keep the family in one piece.
  • The Schwa Was Here, by Neal Shusterman---Anthony, also known as "Antsy," is fascinated by "The Schwa Effect"--the fact that no one ever sees Calvin Schwa. Even when acting weird and dressed like a total freak, The Schwa is only barely noticed. The two boys form a partnership and get away with all kinds of mischief, from conducting experiments at school to confounding opponents on the basketball court. When The Schwa senses that even Antsy is beginning to lose sight of him, he vows to do something that will make him so visible, no one will ever forget him. Any kid who's ever felt unnoticed will identify with Schwa and Antsy and their quest for notoriety.



Students entering 8th grade may choose:
  • The Outsiders, by S.E. Hinton---In Ponyboy's world there are two types of people. There are the Socs, the rich society kids who get away with anything. Then there are the greasers, like Ponyboy, who aren't so lucky. Ponyboy has a few things he can count on: his older brothers, his friends, and trouble with the Socs, whose idea of a good time is beating up greasers. At least he knows what to expect--until the night things go too far.
  • The Giver, by Lois Lowery---December is the time of the annual Ceremony at which each twelve-year-old receives a life assignment determined by the Elders. Jonas watches his friend Fiona named Caretaker of the Old and his cheerful pal Asher labeled the Assistant Director of Recreation, but Jonas has been chosen for something special. When his selection leads him to an unnamed man--the man called only the Giver--he begins to sense the dark secrets that underlie the fragile perfection of his world.